Chad Lindberg Movie: “Decoding Annie Parker: Veteran Cinematographer Takes Turn at the Helm!” Read the Article!

Decoding Annie Parker marks the feature film directing debut of long-time indie cinematographer Steven Bernstein, ASC, who has over 40 cinematography credits, beginning with Conspiracy in 1989.

Decoding Annie Parker takes audiences on an intimate journey based on the real life experiences of two women, who live in parallel worlds. Bernstein was attracted to the story because he was looking to direct a film about something important, explaining:

I asked agents to send me scripts. One of the scripts was about Annie Parker. The script was written by Dr. Michael Moss, a physician who believed it is important for her story to be told. Annie was 13 years old when breast cancer claimed her mother’s life. Her older sister later lost a battle with ovarian cancer. Annie subsequently survived three breast cancer operations.

decoding annie parker

Bernstein contacted Dr. Moss and Annie Parker. After a heartfelt discussion, they gladly accepted his offer to rewrite the script. Bernstein was assisted in that endeavor by his son Adam.

The second woman is Mary-Clare King, a geneticist who spent years searching for a reliable early clue that women will be afflicted with breast cancer. In 1992, she discovered that women with the BRCA1 gene in their DNA are likely to develop breast cancer. King subsequently discovered that the BRCA2 gene in DNA signals ovarian cancer is likely to occur.

To Bernstein, Decoding Annie Parker is a story about faith, hope, and survival during challenging times. It took Bernstein five years to raise the funds needed to produce the film:

Everyone involved believed in the story. Their heartfelt support enabled us to produce Decoding Annie Parker in 35 mm anamorphic format with a $2 million budget. When we added up the numbers, we found that two perf 35 MM film was affordable. We used the 2.4:1 aspect to visually augment the drama. We used empty spaces to show alienation and sadness. I also wanted a dynamic frame that I could move things across.

FULL ARTICLE

Credit : www.moviemaker.com

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